Monday, August 20, 2018

Knick-knack Paddywhack, Please Give ME All the Bones...


I am a collector of bones - beef bones, pork bones, and chicken bones. Now that might sound a little odd if you didn't know that I made broth with them - bone broth.

As some of you know, I had serious gut issues at the beginning of this year. I went through CT scans, MRI scans, multiple rounds of heavy antibiotics, and basically eating almost nothing.  I followed the doctor's orders and like a good patient did what I was suppose to and I still felt awfully sick.

I decided to take matters into my own hands.  After doing much research, I decided to try making my own bone broth and drinking it everyday. In the beginning, I drank it two to three times a day often substituting bone broth for my meals.  And I can tell you that I am feeling much better. Very rarely do I have gut pain. And I haven't felt this healthy in years.

You can buy bone broth in the store or online but it tastes terrible! Homemade bone broth is the best.

Bone broth is full of minerals (especially calcium) and has anti-inflammatory properties to it.  It is excellent for anyone with gut issues. The minerals also will help strengthen your own bones.

How to make bone broth - it really is relatively simple but it is time consuming.  I am sure there are other methods to make it but this is what I do.

Collect bones.  You can save the bones from meat that you have cooked.  Freeze them until you have enough for the broth or you can buy bones (even organic ones) fresh or frozen.  I usually have to buy the beef ones. The beef we buy doesn't have enough bone to it.  I do save my chicken carcasses and chicken leg bones and freeze them until I need them.  You can even use bones that people have gnawed the meat off of (some of you may be thinking - yikes! - but they get boiled for a long time)(the bones not the people!).

Once I have enough bones, I put them in my big crockpot.  Add water until bones are covered.  I add 2 bay leaves, a few whole cloves, and about a tablespoon of peppercorns.  Sometimes I add an onion or celery or other vegetables.  You will strain these all out when you are ready to "can" them.

The bones and such will cook on a low temperature for usually 48 hours. Sometimes longer. Yes, you read that right.  48 hours.

Two days later...


Carefully remove the bones. Straining the broth, ladle it into a large pot. Be careful because it will be very hot still. I like to keep my broth in quart size canning jars. I place a dinner knife in the jar before filling it with broth. The metal helps regulate the heat and the glass won't easily break. You can fill the jars almost up to the top. If you are using beef bones, there will be quite a bit of fat that rises to the top of the broth. Using a turkey baster, I remove as much of the fat as I can. A thin layer will remain and will be easier to remove once the broth is cold.

Time to wash the crockpot, pans, and utensils while the broth cools. The cooling time is usually about an hour. After the dishes are done, it is time to start a new batch of bone broth. I usually get 4 quarts of bone broth from about 4 pounds of bones (one crockpot batch). This only lasts us about 3 days. As you can imagine, my crockpot is almost always simmering bones.

And let's not forget these beauties...


The bones!! If they are beef bones (as these are), I can reuse them again a second time. I make the broth the same way but will simmer them a little longer. Chicken bones are really only good for one batch of bone broth.

It is all quite fascinating really. I like to look at the bones. After simmering for so long, they become soft and eventually begin to deteriorate.

I forgot to tell you that the bone broth also makes your skin softer and firmer. The collagen from the bones does amazing stuff. I have noticed my skin softer. Bone broth is a WIN WIN in my book!


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22 comments:

  1. I find this so amazing, Gina, I have heard so much of the health benefits of bone broth, and have wanted to learn how to make this. Now I have a sound, true and tried recipe. Thank you so much for sharing this. I am copying it and will let you know how it comes out, of course, I must start saving my bones. ~wink~
    Have a blessed evening.
    Sue

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    1. Sue, how exciting! You will need to add salt and pepper (to taste) to it before you drink it. I forgot to add that part to the post. xo

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  2. I've never made this before but I know when I am sick I always crave beef broth or chicken broth. Thanks for telling us how to make this...homemade is so much better!

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    1. Diane, I think my favorite is chicken broth. I have frozen bone broth before. It takes forever to thaw out though. I try to always have some simmering and available to drink.

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  3. Our daughter-in-law got me started on bone broth a few years ago, and while I do not do it faithfully as you do, I find it to be a very rewarding process. Thank you so much for sharing about it here.

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    1. Dianna, I find it satisfying to make something nutritious from something I'd ordinarily just toss out.

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  4. So good to see you again, Gina.
    I always make chicken broth from the bones and carcass, and use it in different ways. We rarely eat beef or red meats now. It's good that you have found something to help you.

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    1. Elizabeth, I prefer chicken bone broth to beef but beef bones are more readily available. Good to see you too!

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  5. Gina,
    Thanks so much for stopping by and for your kind comments!! I make bone broth from turkey breasts and chicken breasts! My Dad taught me how to make it when i was first married 40 years ago and my sons love it!! I too have GI issues. I have IBS and Post Gall Bladder syndrome or Dumping Syndrome. I also had 4 abdominal hernias repaired and have issues with adhesions from the surgery. I am now your newest follower too!! Looking forward to getting to know you better!
    Hugs,
    Deb

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    1. Debbie, you have had more than your fair share of GI issues. I hope they are all behind you now! ♥

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  6. I had no idea. This is fascinating. Thanks for linking to Keep in Touch. I’m keeping this for future reference.

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    1. Hi Katie! Thank you for visiting. If you do a search online about bone broth, you will find out lots more. Very good for you!

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  7. I'm so glad that you're feeling much better, Gina! I do reuse my chicken carcasses, but I need to be more diligent like you! Thank you for sharing all your information, and how it has helped with your health and how the collagen has helped with your skin.

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    1. Kitty, you are very welcome. My favorite is the chicken bone broth. I started some simmering this afternoon!

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  8. Oh I am so glad that you were able to find something to give you relief from your gut problems, that is the worse, my hubby has suffered some of that himself and found the fodmap diet has helped him tremendously.

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    1. Connie, I've not heard of that diet before and will definitely look into it. I am glad that he is better.

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  9. Great post!
    I've had making bone broth on my 'to~do' list for a while now, and with a turkey in the freezer waiting to be roasted, I shall save the carcass and make bone broth!
    I saw a vlog wherein bone broth was made in the Instant Pot. As I have two electric pressure cookers, that may be the way to go for me? We'll see.

    ~Smiles :)
    ~K.

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    1. Hi Kerin. So nice to meet you! My daughter has an Instant Pot. I don't see why you couldn't use pressure cookers. I don't know much about those. Would you be able to safely leave them cooking for days?

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  10. There was an interesting post on one of my favorite blogs today and I saw it listed bone broth. Do you go to this blog? https://thelowcarbdiabetic.blogspot.com/
    Hugs!

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    1. Diane, I will definitely visit. Thank you for letting me know! xo

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  11. Wow Gina, I have never heard of this. It really is interesting! I'm glad you are feeling much better!! Thanks for sharing with SYC.
    hugs,
    Jann

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  12. I always have several quarts of chicken broth in my freezer made from the carcasses of chicken pieces. I freeze them until I have enough to fill the crockpot. I add an onion, a carrot, and a stick of celery or some celery leaves to my broth. The crockpot does such a wonderful job of cooking it slowly and I think it turns out clearer than when I do it on the stove.

    Thawing isn't a problem - I use glass jars (leaving head space when freezing), and can thaw them in the microwave if I forget to take one out earlier.

    Homemade tastes so much better than store bought, and it's almost free to make!

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